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Unabashedly Public

Over the last three years, as I’ve written and spoken about some very personal experiences in my life, I’ve received much praise for my bravery, encouragement from others who were motivated to share their stories and come forward, and my voice has never felt louder or more powerful than ever. When I was younger, I used to have nightmares in which I was attempting to scream at the top of my lungs, I was trying to scream about the pain I was feeling, the injustices that I suffered, and the way they were ignored. Today, I no longer have that dream anymore.

Ever since I found my voice and started writing publicly, there hasn’t been a single day that’s gone by where I looked back and regretted my decision. Whether it was talking about being sexually abused for 4 years during my childhood, undergoing so called conversion therapy to try and become straight or shedding light on other people’s plights and raising awareness through them, it’s always been more rewarding than regretful. Some people have chosen to judge me and label me as a “professional victim,” but as far as I’m concerned if that’s what it takes to get said people to talk about these issues that otherwise go ignored, I’m happy to be a professional victim.

I have many detractors out there, some of whom I know but most of whom I don’t know. It pleases me to know that I’ve earned detractors because that means I was part of the important process that forces people to confront issues that they wouldn’t have otherwise known about because they elected to ignore them. Whether it was about the student in Chicago who was put on notice and threatened with expulsion for going public about her past as a rape survivor; the guy who grew up orthodox and got married even though he was gay; the lack of education in many ultra orthodox communities; and many others, I’m proud that I was able to contribute at least one bit in lending a voice to the voiceless.

I don’t represent any group of people, I am an individual who made a decision to share parts of my personal life with the rest of the world in the hopes that someone would benefit through them. I am so thankful to all my supporters and to all the people who constantly encourage me to write more, the ones who believed in me even when I didn’t believe in myself, and I truly do hope that there will come a time where no one ever feels like they’re screaming on the top of their lungs but can’t be heard.

Lots of love.

Chaim Levin

Comments

  1. A professional victim? Your detractors are unforgivable idiots. You are no professional victim obviously. Professionals are PAID for WORK THEY do. You are something else altogether. Not unlike and ambulance chaser you seek fame by exploiting any attention grabbing issue facing our community. You benefit from others' misfortunes like a maggot engorging itself on a corpse. You're an amateur or maybe aspiring fraud. Bravo!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Anonymous, why don't you clean up your community, and not give Chaim "what to write about"? Oh, but that would entail admitting that there are problems. Can't have anyone thinking the sun isn't always shining in Lubavitch, can you?

      Chaim's real crime is that he threatens your fragile hold on your security blanket.

      Chaim, kol hakavod. Keep doing what you're doing.

      Delete
  2. Chabad Habad is the torah portion of Lech Lecha relates that Avraham built three altars to G-d.1 Rashi, basing his commentary on the Midrash2, explains that Avraham built the first altar “upon hearing G-d’s promise that he would have children, and that they would inherit the land of Israel.”3

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